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ECORES Lecture Series Print
Thursday, 19 April 2018, 18:00 - 22:00

Inaugural Lecture : Should the Government Control What We Eat ?

by Rachel Griffith 

Rachel Griffith is Research Director of the IFS and Co-Director of the Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP). She is Professor of Economics at the University of Manchester, a Fellow of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Econometric Society and a Research Fellow of CEPR. Rachel won the Birgit Grodal award in 2014 and was awarded a CBE in Queen's Birthday Honours 2015 for services to economic policy. Her research considers the relationship between government policy and economic performance. Her specific interests relate to empirical industrial organisation, the retail food sector, nutrition, innovation, productivity and corporate tax. 


Outline: Obesity is a worldwide problem, with about 13% of the world’s population estimate to be obese in 2016. In the UK obesity prevalence increased from 15 % in 1993 to 27 % in 2015, with over 1 in 5 children in reception, and over 1 in 3 children in Year 6 measured as obese or overweight. Children living in the most deprived areas are twice as likely to be obese compared to those in the least deprived areas.
These differences can have long term consequences for health as well as social and economic outcomes. Policies such as taxes on junk foods, restrictions to the availability and advertising of foods, nutritional labelling and regulation to encourage firms to reformulate products aims to encourage a healthier diet, but these policies have sometimes proved controversial. In this lecture series Professor Rachel Griffith, will discuss what different types of policies aimed at reducing obesity might achieve in terms of reduce long-run inequalities in health, social and economic outcomes.  

Location: ULB R42.5.503
Contact: Nancy De Munck - This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Registration is free but compulsory: https://goo.gl/forms/B6yDZN2mkY2hvcN42 or send an email to Nancy : ndemunck@ulb..ac.be

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